Let's Make Robots! | RobotShop

Creative Commons License Idea

The idea of implementing the Creative Commons License (used on several other sites with user-generated content) was suggested to us and we're eager to get your feedback. Thank you for the suggestion AndyGadget.

If you're not sure what Creative Commons is or why it exists, take a look at the Creative Commons Website here:

http://creativecommons.org/

They also have a cute video about why they exist:

http://creativecommons.org/videos/get-creative

The idea would be to have the contributor / content creator choose from several different creative commons licenses (for example a drop-down list) when they add content to the site. This CC license would then be displayed for all to see and would be relevant to blog / robot posts as opposed to content on the forum or in comments.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/

You can see how Thingiverse (a site owned and operated by MakerBot where users can upload 3D models for others to see and download) words it on their website here:

https://www.thingiverse.com/legal

Take a look specifically at section 4. Secondary License for Thingiverse Designs.

When you upload certain User Content to the Sites or Services, you will be asked to select a secondary copyright license, which is additional to the license you grant to the Company and its affiliates and partners in Section 3.2. This license will govern how other Sites or Services users may use your User Content. You can designate this license to be one of the Creative Commons Licenses (see http://www.creativecommons.org) listed in the pull-down menu on the Sites. You agree that the Company may make your User Content available to other Sites or Services users, subject to such other Sites or Services users abiding by the terms of this secondary license; however, if you select the "All Rights Reserved" secondary copyright license, you agree that it means the Company may display your User Content for public viewing on the Sites and other Sites or Services users must contact you to obtain additional rights, as necessary. While the Company will advise other Sites or Services users of the secondary license you select and request that the terms of such license be observed, you acknowledge that it is not the Company's responsibility to enforce this secondary license and the Company cannot guarantee that your secondary license will in fact be observed by other Sites or Services users.

Note that the objective of adding a creative commons license would be to help ensure that the content / material you create is protected - the way you want. For the moment, the Terms and Conditions on LMR exists largely to ensure LMR is protected, and emphasizes that the creator of the content maintains rights over the material and IP. However, it does not say anything about how others outside of LMR can make use of the material, which is where Creative Commons might come in.

So, do you think the Creative Commons License would / should apply to LMR? Why or why not? We're eager to get your feedback in the comments section below.

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I've recently started posted some designs on Thingiverse, and I really like how the've integrated usage rights into their platform.

You can specify your rights when you post, like "Public Domain", or "CC-Attribution". 

This is actually something I have been wishing for. 

I´ve used CC-Attribution several times,

I also know people who feel more comfortable using that or any other form. So making it clear to use will be maybe a good way to improve safety and transparency. Thanks for considering the chance.

Without any tools is as simple to add "licensed under -link to license-". The default way robot posts were used is a sort of CC-BY-NC-SA. It would be cool to have a wiki section.

That would be a very nice protection of my content for you to put in place.  Right now, I assume that anything I post to the internet is content that no longer belongs to me; it is gone to the wild, wild west and might languish in obscurity or find new life as partially scavenged code in the next great robotic revolution.  The result is that I might withhold something if ever thought it might turn into a product of some sort.  

I would appreciate if you could put something like that in place.  

Regards,

Bill